Quotulatiousness

January 11, 2018

5 Tips For A Small Wood Workshop – making the most of your space

Filed under: Woodworking — Tags: , — Nicholas @ 02:00

Rag ‘n’ Bone Brown
Published on 30 Jul 2016

Five tips for making the most of the space in your small workshop.

Here are links to the other workshop project videos I mentioned:
Making a stand/mobile base for the electric planer http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VP0X7F…
Making a workbench http://goo.gl/Z521Dk
Making a mitre saw station part 1 http://goo.gl/s4vtvC
Making a mitre saw station part 2 http://goo.gl/4N4iX5

Thanks for watching! Please subscribe!

http://www.ragnbonebrown.com

January 5, 2018

Screws: What You Need to Know

Filed under: Woodworking — Tags: , — Nicholas @ 02:00

Essential Craftsman
Published on 27 Jun 2017

Screws are one of the greatest fasteners available. There is a screw for almost every application. I cover some of the basics necessary for understanding the advantages of the modern screw.

I can’t find my parachute bag on amazon. The one there appears to be a cheap knock/off of sorts……would love it if some one could find out if the real ones are still available somewhere. I’ll try and get some pictures up!

December 11, 2017

French Cleats – How to hang Wall Cupboards

Filed under: Woodworking — Tags: , — Nicholas @ 02:00

Greg Virgoe
Published on 23 Apr 2017

In this video we explain how to hang your wall cupboards using a French Cleat system. We demonstrate how the french cleat works and go on to hang the cupboards we made in the previous video.

November 18, 2017

The Best Way to Set Up a Bandsaw!

Filed under: Technology, Woodworking — Tags: — Nicholas @ 02:00

The Wood Whisperer
Published on 6 Jul 2017

Back in 2007, I posted a video on Bandsaw Setup. The method I demonstrated was one I learned from other woodworkers as well as numerous books and manuals. While the method works perfectly, it overcomplicates things and employs a couple of unnecessary steps, namely achieving coplanarity of the wheels and eliminating drift. Four years later, I became aware of a video from The Woodworking Shows featuring Alex Snodgrass and his simpler (and nearly foolproof) method for bandsaw tuneup. I have since become friendly with Alex and asked him if he’d be willing to come out to my shop to film his setup method. He agreed and here we are! I can say without a doubt that this is the BEST way to set up a bandsaw.

Align the Blade

Install the blade and apply just enough tension to keep the blade securely on the wheels. Use the tracking adjustment while turning the wheel by hand to line up the deepest part of the gullet with the center of the top wheel.

Tension the Blade

You can usually ignore the tenon meter on most bandsaws as they are notoriously inaccurate. Instead, tension the blade until your finger is only able to deflect the blade by about 1/4″. This test should be done at the back of the saw where nothing can get in the way of the blade. The amount of pressure you apply to the blade shouldn’t result in turning your finger white. If that happens, you’re pushing too hard. After the tension is set, make sure the blade is still tracking properly with the gullet in the center of the top wheel.

Side Guides (Front to Back)

The front of the side guides should be located about 1/16″ back from the deepest part of the blade gullets. You don’t want the side guides to contact the cutting teeth of the blade since the teeth flare out at a slight angle. This adjustment is made to both the top and bottom guides.

Thrust Bearings

Adjust the thrust bearings carefully so that they do NOT rotate while the blade moves, but they DO begin to rotate as soon as light pressure is applied to the blade. Spend the necessary time to get this adjustment just right. Of course, you’ll do this adjustment to both the top and bottom guides.

Side Guides (Side to Side)

Just like the thrust bearing adjustment, the side guides should be as close to the blade as possible without actually touching. So when the blade moves the bearings should be stationary. When a slight amount of pressure is applied to the blade as its moving, the bearings should spin.

Square the Table

Using a 2×4 or 2×6, make a partial cut into the face of the board. Turn the saw off, flip the board around and try to get the blade to slide into the cut slot. If it slides in easily and without resistance, we know the table is 90 degrees to the blade. If it doesn’t slide in, make adjustments to the table and cut/test again. The wider the board is, the more accurate this test will be.

Align the Fence

The fence can be aligned parallel with the body of the blade using nothing more than a ruler. Be sure the ruler is resting on the body of the blade between the teeth. With a long enough ruler you can easily align the fence by eye. Alex shows us the F.A.S.T system which is a simple and convenient way to do this same task.

Test Cut

Since the overall goal of this setup process is to prepare for resawing, a good test is to slice off a thin veneer from a jointed and planed board. In our first test cut we were able to slice off a piece that was .016″ or just over 1/64″. This is way thinner than anything I’d ever need but it’s pretty cool to see that the saw is capable of making such a delicate cut.

Special thanks to Alex Snodgrass and Carter Products for helping make this video possible. Happy bandsawing!

November 7, 2017

How To: Make French Cleat Storage

Filed under: Woodworking — Tags: , — Nicholas @ 02:00

Make It Now
Published on 22 Dec 2016

Today I’m going to be adding some storage options for the French cleat wall I built a little while back. If you haven’t seen that video, check it out and then come back to this one.

September 11, 2017

5 Woodworking Cuts You Need to Know How to Make | WOODWORKING BASICS

Filed under: Technology, Woodworking — Tags: — Nicholas @ 02:00

Published on 9 Jun 2017

Sometimes the terminology gets confusing, so in this BASICS episode, I’ll break down the 5 basic types of woodworking cuts and how to make them.

September 2, 2017

Making zero clearance table saw inserts

Filed under: Technology, Woodworking — Tags: — Nicholas @ 02:00

Published on 13 May 2012

Showing the steps for making a zero clearance table saw insert
http://woodgears.ca/delta_saw/insert.html

August 26, 2017

Building a French Cleat System for Power Tools

Filed under: Technology, Woodworking — Tags: , — Nicholas @ 02:00

Published on 26 Jul 2015

For a written tutorial check out my blog at http://wilkerdos.com/2015/07/power-tool-french-cleat-system/

Follow me on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/wilkerdos

Visit Triton’s homepage: http://www.tritontools.com

This week I build individual holders for each one of my power tools so that I can store them on a French cleat system.

August 20, 2017

Evaluating Used Hand Tool Condition

Filed under: Technology, Woodworking — Tags: , — Nicholas @ 02:00

Published on 8 Aug 2017

Shopping or used hand tools can be fun, but it’s important to know what you’re buying to make sure it’s a deal. Hand tool expert Ron Herman shares a bit of knowledge with us about considering the condition of used hand tools. For more information on hand tools, visit: http://www.popwood.com/tools/woodworking-hand-tools

August 6, 2017

A Shooting Board – Why You Should Make One – 264

Filed under: Technology, Woodworking — Tags: , — Nicholas @ 02:00

Published on 23 Oct 2016

Build article: https://jayscustomcreations.com/2016/10/a-shooting-board/

August 1, 2017

106 – How to Build a French Cleat Storage System

Filed under: Technology, Woodworking — Tags: , — Nicholas @ 02:00

Published on 17 Nov 2009

Original post on our site with additional information, plans, questions & comments:
http://www.thewoodwhisperer.com/videos/french-cleat-storage-system/

A French cleat is as ingenious as it is simple. It involves securing a strip of wood with a 45 degree bevel to the wall, and then securing an opposing beveled strip on the back of a cabinet or anything you want to hang. Its incredibly strong and versatile. Its a great way to hang cabinetry and as you’ll see in this video, it can be used to make an awesome modular wall storage unit.

July 23, 2017

Setting-up Your First Woodworking Shop Pt. 2

Filed under: Technology, Woodworking — Tags: — Nicholas @ 02:00

Published on 21 Jun 2014

http://HomegrownFurniture.com Create your very first woodworking shop for under five hundred dollars. In part two of this video series, woodworker Jim Thompson offers more workshop tool tips for a new furniture builder on a budget. Jim goes over popular, low-cost options for a router, clamps and a sander.

July 21, 2017

Chisel Tricks for Hand-Cut Joinery

Filed under: Technology, Woodworking — Tags: , , — Nicholas @ 02:00

Published on 2 Oct 2014

Period furniture maker Philip C. Lowe demonstrates the right way to use your bench chisel when paring joinery and mortising for hinges.

July 16, 2017

Woodworking magazines and the lack of safety equipment in photos

Filed under: Technology, Woodworking — Tags: , , — Nicholas @ 03:00

I’ve bought hundreds of woodworking magazines over the years, and in almost every one of them they show machine tool operations where the blade guards have been removed “to clearly illustrate the task”. I understand that reasoning, but the cumulative effect of literally thousands of well-posed, clear, and dangerous practices is almost certainly to lessen the background awareness of new woodworkers to safe use of the tools. When I first got into woodworking, I was buying at least half a dozen magazines every month (ShopNotes, Woodsmith, Popular Woodworking, Fine Woodworking, Woodworker’s Journal, etc.) because I hadn’t touched a real woodworking tool since I was in middle school (and I hated shop at that time anyway), and I knew I needed as much help as I could get.

If I hadn’t been a safety wuss, I’d likely have internalized the “common wisdom” that everyone always takes off the blade guard of the table saw — because they so rarely showed up in the magazine articles and when they did, they made the photo less helpful because of the area of the work they obscured. Overheard conversations at woodworking shows often included comments about throwing away the stock blade guard as soon as possible … and not to replace it with an expensive after-market item, either.

Paul Sellers, who generally works with hand tools, has also been irritated by this and his latest blog post takes the magazines to task:

I thumbed through recent issues of wood mags and though I have known it for years, I thought it might be good to tackle the giant issue surrounding machine safety as some woodworking magazines don’t always project the right image. In fact some give the impression that no safeguards or safety equipment is necessary at all, the exact opposite of what the woodworking machine industry teaches altogether. My concern is that the woodworking magazines get most of their support from amateur woodworkers looking for guidance and inspiration. This advertising sector caters to the amateur woodworker industry with only a little crossover into professional realms. Thumbing through the magazines I was not really considering safety at all, just looking for content of interest to me, but I soon became conscious of the lack of safety equipment being used, which started my inbuilt alarm bells started ringing page after page. See if the images below don’t cause the same sense of concern for you.

[…]

So here we are, five images spanning a few pages with not a face shield in sight and only one pair of safety glasses between four of the five images. Then we have zero regard for any dust protection issues and that is of great concern to all woodworkers. Now I know you can say to me that all woodworkers know about machine dust, tablesaw kick-back issues, noise that causes partial impairment and even permanent hearing loss and so on. Of course that is not really true at all. The people in the pictures are all professional-level woodworkers, authors, editors and so on. Evidently they don’t feel the image they convey with regards to safety is questionable. If that is so, why would we expect the amateurs and those brand new to woodworking to be conscious of dangers that are often less obvious and even well hidden.

The trip mechanism in my brain asked the question, why is it that something so unarguably dangerous as machine woodworking is presented with such passivity toward safety and with no need to show industry standards for normal health and safety protocol put together by professional bodies of the woodworking industry itself? Yes, I know all the reasonable arguments. “They are just posing and not really working.” “The machines are not switched on, perhaps, therefore there is no need to wear any safety equipment. Why would you?” Well, actually, in a couple of the images, the tablesaw is running and there is no need for anyone looking in, to believe that the others are not either anyway.

Image 1:

a: The man has no safety mask on at all b: There is no blade guard over the blade c: The man has no safety glasses on. d: The man has no protective dust mask or respirator equipment.

The dangers ever present in this scenario are: 1: He is breathing harmful dust as he works with the machine no matter how good any dust extraction is. 2: Even though there is a riving knife in place my experience has shown that the wood can still close over on the rear upthrust of the blade and and kick-back the wood at his upper body and face. 3: There is no doubt that the small offcut is a missile waiting to catch. The drafts and movement of wood often cause an upthrust on small pieces and can deliver them to the rear upthrust of the blade once detached as shown. 4: The dust from tablesaws is of course extremely fine and circulates in the atmosphere even with the best dust extraction in the world. This dust is some of the most harmful to the whole respiratory system, eyes, nasal passages and throat.

I use a tablesaw sled similar to the one shown in the photo above, and to use it I have to remove the blade guard on my saw. I’ve considered adding a plexiglass strip over the blade opening for quite some time, to provide at least some protection against offcuts being kicked back from the back of the saw blade. I always use hearing protection when using any of my power tools, but I don’t always add a dust mask unless I’m doing a lot of cutting over a short period of time. Perhaps I should reconsider that.

This is the real McCoy. My friend Chris gears up every time, as I and others do.

So why do the editors allow poses that include the faces? As far as information goes the faces or facial expressions give nothing to the reader and are inconsequential. Mostly it’s to do with presenting the acceptable image that down plays the essentiality of safety to its core audience. In my view it is of little value to put a little disclaimer in the corner of a page if the images send another message that woodworking without protective equipment is perfectly safe. No one is exempted from responsibility in this. Not the authors, the photographers, the editors or the publishers. They all have responsibility for promoting unsafe practices. Even with safety equipment things go wrong in a split second. We can take care of our lungs, eyes and faces with very low-maintenance equipment.

My advice to any new woodworker wanting to compliment their work by using machines for dimensioning stock would be to find courses tailored to specific machines. Good online material is available from recognised institutions too. You must be careful of course, as looking for information based on good experience can be hard as some things are based more on opinion than experience. Look for experienced teachers and organisations with the right background. Generally these are information based but then you must put into practice what you are taught and by experience you will gain the experience you need to anticipate potential issues. No one else can substitute for your individual responsibility.

July 13, 2017

Setting-up Your First Woodworking Shop Pt. 1

Filed under: Technology, Woodworking — Tags: , — Nicholas @ 02:00

Published on 7 Jun 2014

http://HomegrownFurniture.com Create your own woodworking shop from scratch. In part one of this video series, woodworker Jim Thompson helps you build your very first woodworking workshop. Jim includes buying tips, craigslist tactics and tool recommendations for a new woodworker on a budget.

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