Quotulatiousness

November 21, 2017

Which Plane Should I Buy First? | Paul Sellers

Filed under: Woodworking — Tags: — Nicholas @ 02:00

Paul Sellers
Published on 10 Nov 2017

Which plane should I buy first? A common question for beginner woodworkers. Paul goes through a few different models to show where he would recommend most.

For more information on these topics, see https://paulsellers.com or https://woodworkingmasterclasses.com

October 27, 2017

How to Make Small Dovetail Boxes | Episode 3 | Paul Sellers

Filed under: Woodworking — Tags: , — Nicholas @ 02:00

Paul Sellers
Published on 16 Oct 2017

This is one of our very early Woodworking Masterclasses series from 2013. In the third episode of this dovetail series Paul finishes the simple chisel tray. Watch it carefully. This episode shows quite simple steps but it contains some great, and quite complicated, planing techniques.

October 20, 2017

How to Make Small Dovetail Boxes | Episode 2 | Paul Sellers

Filed under: Woodworking — Tags: , — Nicholas @ 02:00

Paul Sellers
Published on 9 Oct 2017

This is one of our very early Woodworking Masterclasses series from 2013. In this second episode Paul continues to show how to cut the dovetail and also shows how to prepare the box for glue-up. This requires a few hand plane tricks that will prove helpful in future projects and are well worth watching! Enjoy!

For more information on these topics, see https://paulsellers.com or https://woodworkingmasterclasses.com

October 12, 2017

How to Make Small Dovetail Boxes | Episode 1 | Paul Sellers

Filed under: Woodworking — Tags: , , — Nicholas @ 02:00

Paul Sellers
Published on 2 Oct 2017

In this first episode of one of our first Woodworking Masterclasses series, Paul shows how to prepare the wood and cut the tails for the dovetails. These steps will be repeated for other boxes in this series. It will show how the basics can be adapted to more complex projects.

For more information on these topics, see https://paulsellers.com or https://woodworkingmasterclasses.com

September 29, 2017

How to Make a Sharpening Plate Holder | Paul Sellers

Filed under: Woodworking — Tags: , — Nicholas @ 02:00

Paul Sellers
Published on 18 Sep 2017

The sharpening plate holder is used daily and is a vital part of Paul’s sharpening system. Paul shows how to make your own using just a few hand tools. It holds the stones securely, keeping them in order from coarse to fine, which means you can easily pull it out and be ready for a quick sharpen.

For more information on these topics, see https://paulsellers.com or https://woodworkingmasterclasses.com

September 21, 2017

The Paul Sellers’ Mortise & Tenon Method | Paul Sellers

Filed under: Technology, Woodworking — Tags: , — Nicholas @ 02:00

Published on 11 Sep 2017

Paul has developed his own system for cutting mortise and tenon joints using a conventional hand router plane to create perfectly sized mortise and tenons that are accurately aligned. This system will revolutionise the way you think about mortise and tenon joinery.

September 1, 2017

Mis-placing Your Plane? | Paul Sellers

Filed under: Technology, Woodworking — Tags: — Nicholas @ 02:00

Published on 21 Aug 2017

Paul shows how he handles and places his bench plane in the day to day of woodworking for practical use.

For more information on these topics, see https://paulsellers.com or https://woodworkingmasterclasses.com

August 20, 2017

Evaluating Used Hand Tool Condition

Filed under: Technology, Woodworking — Tags: , — Nicholas @ 02:00

Published on 8 Aug 2017

Shopping or used hand tools can be fun, but it’s important to know what you’re buying to make sure it’s a deal. Hand tool expert Ron Herman shares a bit of knowledge with us about considering the condition of used hand tools. For more information on hand tools, visit: http://www.popwood.com/tools/woodworking-hand-tools

August 9, 2017

How to use a Wooden Spokeshave | Paul Sellers

Filed under: Technology, Woodworking — Tags: — Nicholas @ 04:00

Published on 8 Aug 2017

Wooden spokeshaves may seem like they’ve been superseded, but they are very useful in the day to day of woodworking. A wooden sole means minimal friction and Paul shows how to easily micro adjust the blade for a variety of uses.

To make the Poor Man’s Spokeshave, see the series on YouTube (link: https://youtu.be/jZwzBbcwbgU).

August 6, 2017

A Shooting Board – Why You Should Make One – 264

Filed under: Technology, Woodworking — Tags: , — Nicholas @ 02:00

Published on 23 Oct 2016

Build article: https://jayscustomcreations.com/2016/10/a-shooting-board/

July 21, 2017

Chisel Tricks for Hand-Cut Joinery

Filed under: Technology, Woodworking — Tags: , , — Nicholas @ 02:00

Published on 2 Oct 2014

Period furniture maker Philip C. Lowe demonstrates the right way to use your bench chisel when paring joinery and mortising for hinges.

July 7, 2017

How to Prepare Stock for Joinery | Paul Sellers

Filed under: Technology, Woodworking — Tags: , , — Nicholas @ 02:00

Published on 23 Jun 2017

What do you need to do to your dimensioned wood to prepare it for joinery? Often there are undulations or machine marks in the surface of the wood, or movement after dimensioning that needs removing before joinery layout occurs. Let’s work on getting the silky smooth surface and square faces that make for crisp, accurate joinery.

For more information on these topics, see https://paulsellers.com or https://woodworkingmasterclasses.com

June 28, 2017

Handsaw comparison – Japanese pull-cut versus Western push-cut

Filed under: Japan, Technology, Woodworking — Tags: , — Nicholas @ 03:00

On Facebook, Paul Sellers posted a couple of photos showing the differences between some traditional western hand saws, which cut on the push stroke, and traditional Japanese hand saws, which cut on the pull stroke:

When you hear people say Japanese saws cut better, cut cleaner, cut faster, cut easier, usually it’s not necessarily true. In reality the Japanese saws cut on a pull stroke and the western saw on a push. When sharpened properly both cut very well. The difference for me is that one is a throwaway, the other a keeper for a lifetime. I own saws made in England and the USA that are totally functional and range in age from between the early 1800s 1860s and some up to date that I use daily. You can make any saw any thickness you like and it will work well.
Just saying.

The main difference nowadays is you throw away the Japanese saws because you can’t sharpen them whereas a decent western saw can be sharpened, well, for 200 years when you learn how. Most people can master saw sharpening with an hour of practice.


June 25, 2017

Sometimes, the workman is right to blame his tools

Filed under: Germany, Technology, Woodworking — Tags: , , , — Nicholas @ 03:00

Paul Sellers recently bought and tested a new Two Cherries brand “Gent’s saw” and was very unhappy with the tool:

This week I picked up a brand new gent’s saw straight from the pack made by the famous German tool makers Two Cherries. I noticed the unusual tooth shape, which strangely resembled the edge of a tin can when we used to open it with a multipurpose survival knife. I wondered how it would work and whether it was just a miscut. I examined several others and realised it was actually intentional as they were indeed manufactured that way. I offered the saw to the wood and the very middle cut with the dovetailed angle and the broken off section was the results of ten strokes.

“The long saw cut on the left is how the saw cuts by a man who has used such saws every day, six days a week for 53 years. The two to the right are how it cuts after sharpening and redefining the teeth.”

Could this truly be the end product of the once highly acclaimed Two Cherries of German tool manufacturing? I looked at the packet and, well, there it was; Made in Germany. So here is my perspective on the saw. Nice beechwood handle–nicely shaped (but it is unfinished), nice brass back, good quality steel plate, not too soft, not too hard. Two Cherries, the materials leave you no excuse for making such a poor grade product. YOU should be very ASHAMED of your product and yourselves. It is the very worst saw of any and all saws ever, ever, ever manufactured. I have never seen anything worse.

[…]

If you bought this saw and you thought the outcome was a result of your inexperience. It’s not. Blame the tool maker. It’s his pure arrogance to think he can pass something off to you like this and call it a dovetail saw. Shame on you Two Cherries, shame on you!

June 12, 2017

How to Make a Dovetail Template | Paul Sellers

Filed under: Technology, Woodworking — Tags: , — Nicholas @ 02:00

Published on 2 Jun 2017

Paul introduces the dovetail template that he has been making and using for over 50 years. It helps you to efficiently mark out the dovetail angle. Making it requires a high degree of accuracy and attention to detail, in order for it to be used as a reference.

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