Quotulatiousness

February 22, 2018

How to Read Wood Grain | Paul Sellers

Filed under: Woodworking — Tags: , , — Nicholas @ 02:00

Paul Sellers
Published on 2 Feb 2018

What does it mean to ‘read the grain’ in woodworking? In this video Paul explains what this means, how to do it, and how it helps you achieve better, quicker results. Paul shows how some pieces of wood can simply be planed using a shallow set and a sharp plane while others need to be planed in the right direction. Sometimes wood can be planed in either direction but occasionally there are pieces of wood that are too difficult to tackle with a plane at all.

For more information on these topics, see https://paulsellers.com or https://woodworkingmasterclasses.com

February 21, 2018

10 AMAZING things you can do with a combination square!

Filed under: Woodworking — Tags: — Nicholas @ 04:00

Stumpy Nubs
Published on 16 Feb 2018

LINKS TO TOOLS SEEN IN VIDEO (clicking on these links helps support us, at no cost to you)►
iGaging combination squares (high quality, moderate price): http://www.chipsfly.com/category/RS.html
Starrett combination squares (highest quality, high price): http://amzn.to/2sC1DLU

February 17, 2018

How to Correct New Saws | Paul Sellers

Filed under: Woodworking — Tags: , — Nicholas @ 04:00

Paul Sellers
Published on 16 Feb 2018

What do you have to do to a saw you’ve just bought to get it ready for work? Paul takes a few minutes to show what it takes to get as saw cutting beautifully.

For more information on these topics, see https://paulsellers.com or https://woodworkingmasterclasses.com

February 8, 2018

Stock Prep by Hand – Christopher Schwarz

Filed under: Woodworking — Tags: , — Nicholas @ 02:00

Popular Woodworking
Published on 2 Feb 2017

Learn how to process rough stock by hand and make it project ready – it’s not as difficult as you might think. (Excerpted from “Build a Hand-Crafted Bookcase,” by Christopher Schwarz – available at ShopWoodworking.com as a video download or DVD.)

January 23, 2018

Paul Sellers on the fascination of working with hand tools

Filed under: Education, Woodworking — Tags: , — Nicholas @ 03:00

Snipped from a longer post by Paul Sellers, discussing how he developed his woodworking beyond just sharing skills in person:

When I’m working in my shop, picking up tools, flipping wood and twisting a plane to a more effective cut, the response to my working with my hands has been something I mostly took for granted. But I became gradually aware of others watching me. I mean sometimes you just catch someone innocently watching somewhere, perhaps in a cafe or something. You glance up and catch them and they, embarrassed, look away. I became ever more conscious that people watched me working with a sort of silent fascination you to me my work was just ordinary work that I did all the time. Suddenly I realised that, ah! they’ve never seen such as this before. I saw then that people in the past three decades would be most unlikely to see such things. Even carpenters may never see or have seem a man like me recess hinges or plane the edge of a door, let alone dovetail a box corner or shape a mould to the edge of a mantle shelf with a block of wood holding a blade. Whereas it is till hard for me to imagine such a thing, it’s become a reality that 99.9% of people living in the world have never in their life seen a man like me working with his hands and working with hand tools instead of machines. To them such a thing has become as if they were watching something, well, magic. A shaving rises from the throat of a plane as if from some secretive place and by some special device and it twists away as a ribbon might flutter in a gentle breeze. It’s a spell plucked from a sorcerer’s hand book causing ribbons of pine to rise skyward before their very eyes. I might take such things for granted because I do see hundreds if not thousands of these things happen in a given day or week. They on the other hand never saw such as this before. If you’ve watched an experienced chef dice up onions with a knife live you’ll know what I mean. So it is with a chisel cut and a smoothing plane, a plough plane and a router plane.

The birth of new-genre woodworkers

When I first began my work training others, my own apprentices, young students and such, children too, it wasn’t at all that I needed more staff but that I couldn’t help myself. It’s always been the same. I never taught to make income because I always earned my income and then taught from my abilities as a producing craftsman. That’s the truth. Because I responded to the yearning of others to become crafting artisans, the outcome led to a new life. Of course they were always adult men who approached me. They wanted me to help them become one kind of woodworker or another. They would stay working with or alongside me for a year or two until they gained a level of proficiency they needed to function well and then they’d move on. Mostly there was some reciprocal gain, mostly it was always tipped in their favour not mine. In fact I would always lose money on the deal because money and making personal gain was never the reason I did it. But it was when I began teaching smaller children through to teenagers that I began seeing the deeper issues. Remember, I wasn’t a teacher being paid for the many evenings I invested in holding classes year in year out. Hundreds of children came to my classes several nights a week for two decades. I never charged a penny and let them use my own tools and supplied the wood until they acquired their own. It was a lot of work but it was such fun too. Dads and lads stood at benches from 7 till 9.30 each night and it was here that I began to see more deeply into the future possibilities of the yet unborn woodworkers be that the kids or their parents. This was an unexpected trip up. A sort of punctuation mark in my history if you will.

Mostly it was dads who came with their boys and it was here that I began to see a latent penchant in dads as they helped their sons to sharpen up chisels or reset a bumped plane. Somehow it was the need of their sons that pulled something out of the dads. You know what it’s like: something goes wrong with your child and you just can’t help yourself but pull out all of the stops to make it right. I would see the dads struggle to find an answer knowing that they might not have the answer at all, but try they might! I had to find the solution and find it I did. I started holding classes for adults so that they could reach the children that I couldn’t. People came to classes from all over the US and then they started flying in from other countries too. On the one hand it was ideal to have face to face contact this way, but on the other I knew the audience was much wider but that I could never reach them without some exponential changes being made.

So anyway, in my own small way I became something of a solution. By the end of two decades I had personally trained 5,000 woodworkers from 5 year olds to ancients through hands-on classes in beginning woodworking. It was and always has been hand tool woodworking and no one else had done such a thing on so wide a scale at that time. I knew I could steer dads to guide their sons and be a bridge for them to continue growing closer through the work in hand. Something that in my view had become increasingly lacking and today is getting far worse. Ultimately, my teaching the children meant also that the dads were gaining the same insights the kids were. Their maturer years combined with experience and strength meant that they could stay ahead of their children to help them. The outcome is more evident today than ever.

December 29, 2017

How to make a Rag-in-a-can Oiler | Paul Sellers

Filed under: Woodworking — Tags: , — Nicholas @ 02:00

Paul Sellers
Published on 8 Feb 2017

Paul demonstrates how to make a Rag-in-a-can Oiler. A useful accessory for smoothing cuts with saws and planes.

For more information on these topics, see https://paulsellers.com or https://woodworkingmasterclasses.com

November 21, 2017

Which Plane Should I Buy First? | Paul Sellers

Filed under: Woodworking — Tags: , — Nicholas @ 02:00

Paul Sellers
Published on 10 Nov 2017

Which plane should I buy first? A common question for beginner woodworkers. Paul goes through a few different models to show where he would recommend most.

For more information on these topics, see https://paulsellers.com or https://woodworkingmasterclasses.com

October 27, 2017

How to Make Small Dovetail Boxes | Episode 3 | Paul Sellers

Filed under: Woodworking — Tags: , , — Nicholas @ 02:00

Paul Sellers
Published on 16 Oct 2017

This is one of our very early Woodworking Masterclasses series from 2013. In the third episode of this dovetail series Paul finishes the simple chisel tray. Watch it carefully. This episode shows quite simple steps but it contains some great, and quite complicated, planing techniques.

October 20, 2017

How to Make Small Dovetail Boxes | Episode 2 | Paul Sellers

Filed under: Woodworking — Tags: , , — Nicholas @ 02:00

Paul Sellers
Published on 9 Oct 2017

This is one of our very early Woodworking Masterclasses series from 2013. In this second episode Paul continues to show how to cut the dovetail and also shows how to prepare the box for glue-up. This requires a few hand plane tricks that will prove helpful in future projects and are well worth watching! Enjoy!

For more information on these topics, see https://paulsellers.com or https://woodworkingmasterclasses.com

October 12, 2017

How to Make Small Dovetail Boxes | Episode 1 | Paul Sellers

Filed under: Woodworking — Tags: , , , — Nicholas @ 02:00

Paul Sellers
Published on 2 Oct 2017

In this first episode of one of our first Woodworking Masterclasses series, Paul shows how to prepare the wood and cut the tails for the dovetails. These steps will be repeated for other boxes in this series. It will show how the basics can be adapted to more complex projects.

For more information on these topics, see https://paulsellers.com or https://woodworkingmasterclasses.com

September 29, 2017

How to Make a Sharpening Plate Holder | Paul Sellers

Filed under: Woodworking — Tags: , , — Nicholas @ 02:00

Paul Sellers
Published on 18 Sep 2017

The sharpening plate holder is used daily and is a vital part of Paul’s sharpening system. Paul shows how to make your own using just a few hand tools. It holds the stones securely, keeping them in order from coarse to fine, which means you can easily pull it out and be ready for a quick sharpen.

For more information on these topics, see https://paulsellers.com or https://woodworkingmasterclasses.com

September 21, 2017

The Paul Sellers’ Mortise & Tenon Method | Paul Sellers

Filed under: Technology, Woodworking — Tags: , , — Nicholas @ 02:00

Published on 11 Sep 2017

Paul has developed his own system for cutting mortise and tenon joints using a conventional hand router plane to create perfectly sized mortise and tenons that are accurately aligned. This system will revolutionise the way you think about mortise and tenon joinery.

September 1, 2017

Mis-placing Your Plane? | Paul Sellers

Filed under: Technology, Woodworking — Tags: , — Nicholas @ 02:00

Published on 21 Aug 2017

Paul shows how he handles and places his bench plane in the day to day of woodworking for practical use.

For more information on these topics, see https://paulsellers.com or https://woodworkingmasterclasses.com

August 20, 2017

Evaluating Used Hand Tool Condition

Filed under: Technology, Woodworking — Tags: , — Nicholas @ 02:00

Published on 8 Aug 2017

Shopping or used hand tools can be fun, but it’s important to know what you’re buying to make sure it’s a deal. Hand tool expert Ron Herman shares a bit of knowledge with us about considering the condition of used hand tools. For more information on hand tools, visit: http://www.popwood.com/tools/woodworking-hand-tools

August 9, 2017

How to use a Wooden Spokeshave | Paul Sellers

Filed under: Technology, Woodworking — Tags: , — Nicholas @ 04:00

Published on 8 Aug 2017

Wooden spokeshaves may seem like they’ve been superseded, but they are very useful in the day to day of woodworking. A wooden sole means minimal friction and Paul shows how to easily micro adjust the blade for a variety of uses.

To make the Poor Man’s Spokeshave, see the series on YouTube (link: https://youtu.be/jZwzBbcwbgU).

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