Quotulatiousness

April 30, 2017

Minnesota Vikings 2017 draft – third day

Filed under: Football — Tags: , , — Nicholas @ 05:00

After no activity on the first day of the draft, the Vikings war room did a lot of things on the second day, including two trades to move up in both the second and third rounds (drafting running back Dalvin Cook and centre Pat Elflein), and then two trades to move down in the later rounds. At the end of Friday’s trading session, these were the seven draft picks the Vikings had in hand:

  • Fourth round, No. 109 (from San Francisco)
  • Fourth round, No. 120
  • Fourth round, No. 132 (from Kansas City). Traded to Philadelphia for pick 139 in the fourth, and a seventh round pick (215th overall). The 139th pick was then traded to Kansas City for two picks in the fifth round (170th and 180th overall).
  • Sixth round, No. 199
  • Seventh round, No. 219 (from San Francisco)
  • Seventh round, No. 232
  • Seventh round, No. 245 (from Kansas City)

(more…)

Fight For Air Supremacy – Bloody April 1917 I THE GREAT WAR Special feat. Real Engineering

Filed under: Britain, Europe, Germany, History, Military — Tags: , , — Nicholas @ 04:00

Published on 29 Apr 2017

Check out Real Engineering and their video about WW1 airplanes: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MI08NGCgISE

Meet us and see original WW1 airplanes: http://bit.ly/TGWStowMaries

“Bloody April” was the result of two competing aviation strategies: The more defence oriented German Luftstreitkräfte and the more offensive oriented British Royal Flying Corps. The RFC needed air reconnaissance for the Battle of Arras and the Germans needed to deny them them. With the superior German Albatross D.III fighters, the German Jagdstaffeln inflicted heavy losses on the RFC.

[p-hacking] “is one of the many questionable research practices responsible for the replication crisis in the social sciences”

Filed under: Health, Media, Science — Tags: , , — Nicholas @ 03:00

What happens when someone digs into the statistics of highly influential health studies and discovers oddities? We’re in the process of finding out in the case of “rockstar researcher” Brian Wansink and several of his studies under the statistical microscope:

Things began to go bad late last year when Wansink posted some advice for grad students on his blog. The post, which has subsequently been removed (although a cached copy is available), described a grad student who, on Wansink’s instruction, had delved into a data set to look for interesting results. The data came from a study that had sold people coupons for an all-you-can-eat buffet. One group had paid $4 for the coupon, and the other group had paid $8.

The hypothesis had been that people would eat more if they had paid more, but the study had not found that result. That’s not necessarily a bad thing. In fact, publishing null results like these is important — failure to do so leads to publication bias, which can lead to a skewed public record that shows (for example) three successful tests of a hypothesis but not the 18 failed ones. But instead of publishing the null result, Wansink wanted to get something more out of the data.

“When [the grad student] arrived,” Wansink wrote, “I gave her a data set of a self-funded, failed study which had null results… I said, ‘This cost us a lot of time and our own money to collect. There’s got to be something here we can salvage because it’s a cool (rich & unique) data set.’ I had three ideas for potential Plan B, C, & D directions (since Plan A had failed).”

The responses to Wansink’s blog post from other researchers were incredulous, because this kind of data analysis is considered an incredibly bad idea. As this very famous xkcd strip explains, trawling through data, running lots of statistical tests, and looking only for significant results is bound to turn up some false positives. This practice of “p-hacking” — hunting for significant p-values in statistical analyses — is one of the many questionable research practices responsible for the replication crisis in the social sciences.

H/T to Kate at Small Dead Animals for the link.

French Cleat Wall System and Lots of Boxes

Filed under: Technology, Woodworking — Tags: — Nicholas @ 02:00

Published on 14 Aug 2015

Subscribe for weekly projects! French cleats are a really great organization system and in this video I show how I added them to my shop to organize tools, nails, screws and my shop vac. I got to use my box joint jig as well to make 43 boxes.

Blog Post about French Cleats
http://www.darbinorvar.com/darbin-blog/2015/8/14/french-cleat-wall-system-for-organizing-everything

Table Saw Cross Cut Sled
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dnBaoRYDBLg

Variable Box Joint Jig
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t2qwQqW1d68

QotD: Famous for being famous

Filed under: Britain, Media, Quotations — Tags: , — Nicholas @ 01:00

Every country that has television, which is all of them, must have celebrities who are famous for almost nothing. The U.K. practically specializes in this. But the “almost” is important. Even the weird layer of U.K. celebrity that subsists on the old country’s old-fashioned panel and reality shows normally tends to demand that a celeb have been a member of Parliament or received a surgically enhanced bosom. If possible, both.

Colby Cosh, “On the ignominious downfall of Jared from Subway”, National Post, 2015-08-20.

Powered by WordPress